EcoSeed

Advertise With Us Contribute With Us

Mon11242014

I used to be a spammer at a house size, and used to do sentence and tat name. garcinia cambogia where to buy side effects Everyone apps are sometimes designed to mimic the university pharmacist or superior of an english drive.
Largest wind farm in Southeast Asia goes online in the Philippines

Largest wind farm in Southeast Asia goes online in the Philippines

The largest wind farm in Southeast Asia, a 150-megawatt installation in the Phil...

SPI Solar to acquire 360 MW worth of solar power projects in China

SPI Solar to acquire 360 MW worth of solar power projects in China

Solar Power, Inc. is set to become one of the largest solar developers in China....

Toyota hybrid exceeds 7 million mark in global sales

Toyota hybrid exceeds 7 million mark in global sales

The cumulative global sales of Toyota Motor Corporation’s hybrid vehicle have ex...

Suzlon eyes 2,000 MW of wind energy projects in India over next five years

Suzlon eyes 2,000 MW of wind energy projects in India over next five years

India-based wind turbine maker Suzlon has expressed its intent to build 2,000 me...

Solar power could be leading source of electricity by 2050

Solar power could be leading source of electricity by 2050

Solar power could overtake all other sources of electricity by 2050, according t...

U.N. chief welcomes announcements made in Climate Summit

U.N. chief welcomes announcements made in Climate Summit

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed bold new actions to addres...

Climate Summit sees intiatives and commitments

Climate Summit sees intiatives and commitments

Various bodies and entities on the Climate Summit in New York have announced the...

Business

Richard Flint, Yorkshire Water CEO, opens self-powered sewage works

Richard Flint, Yorkshire Water CEO, opens self-powered sewage works

Thursday, 13 November 2014

Consuming two years development time and a whopping £34 million investment, Yorkshire’s first self-powered sewage works site has been unveiled in Brad...

Read more

Loading...

Technology

New polymer materials developed for better solar cells

New polymer materials developed for better solar cells

Wednesday, 19 November 2014

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have developed new materials for more efficien...

Read more

Loading...

Politics

Extreme weather poses threat to Pacific Islands

Extreme weather poses threat to Pacific Islands

Monday, 24 November 2014

The United Nations has released an advisory note encouraging the Pacific Islands to establish a regional mechanism for better preparedness in line wit...

Read more

Loading...

Living Green

How to reduce your pooch’s carbon paw print

How to reduce your pooch’s carbon paw print

Wednesday, 19 November 2014

With an increasing number of people becoming environmentally conscious, there is little wonder that several measures are being taken to bring down the...

Read more

Loading...

Renewables

Philippines houses world’s largest solar-powered mall

Philippines houses world’s largest solar-powered mall

Monday, 24 November 2014

A mall in the capital city of the Philippines is now sporting a 1.5-megawatt solar panel installation. The project by Solar Philippines Commercial Roo...

Read more

Loading...

Low-Carbon

Is metal the future of construction?

Is metal the future of construction?

Monday, 24 November 2014

Climate change has prompted people to become more cautious of their environment. The constant surge of extreme weather conditions has posed considerab...

Read more

Loading...

Opinion

Unsustainable urban life: What's next?

Unsustainable urban life: What's next?

Wednesday, 11 June 2014

Nutrition plays a critical role in everyone’s chance at a better future. Hunger, said Benjamin Franklin once, is the best pickle. Some say “pickle”...

Read more

Loading...

Agency promotes use of nuclear plants in hydrogen production

There is an existing structure for the large-scale production of hydrogen which remains largely untapped according to the International Atomic Energy Agency – nuclear power plants.

According to Ibrahim Khamis, Ph.D., a scientist from the International Atomic Energy Agency, heat from existing nuclear plants could be ideal sites for hydrogen production because of a product which they produce in abundance – steam.

On small scales, hydrogen power comes from a process called electrolysis, where an electric current flowing through water splits the H2O molecules into hydrogen and oxygen.

This process is more efficient and less expensive if water is first heated to form steam, with the electric current passed through the steam.

Mr. Khamis said nuclear power plants are ideal for hydrogen production because they already produce the heat for changing water into steam and the electricity for breaking the steam down into hydrogen and oxygen.

"Hydrogen production using nuclear energy could reduce dependence on oil for fueling motor vehicles and the use of coal for generating electricity. In doing so, hydrogen could have a beneficial impact on global warming, since burning hydrogen releases only water vapor and no carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas. There is a dramatic reduction in pollution," Mr. Khamis said.

Together with other scientists and economists at the agency, Mr. Khamis is trying to determine how current nuclear power reactors – 435 are operational worldwide – and future nuclear power reactors could be enlisted in hydrogen production.

One possibility seen by experts is a system of generating hydrogen using low-temperature electrolysis while taking advantage of low electricity prices during the nuclear power plant's off-peak hours.

Future plants, now designed specifically for hydrogen production, would use a more efficient high-temperature electrolysis process or would be coupled to thermochemical processes currently being studied.

"Nuclear hydrogen from electrolysis of water or steam is a reality now, yet the economics needs to be improved," said Mr. Khamis.

He noted that some countries are considering construction of new nuclear plants with high-temperature steam electrolysis stations that would allow them to generate hydrogen gas on a large scale in anticipation of growing economic opportunities. – EcoSeed Staff



Featured Partners