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Mon03022015

Technology

Pressure cooking improves lithium iron phosphate batteries

Battery technologies for electric cars are under a lot of pressure to be smaller, more powerful and more energy efficient. Now, a team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside are using pressure itself to improve key materials in current electric car batteries to develop the batteries of the future. The researchers, from the universities Bourns College of Engineering, have...

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The Future of Clean Boat Technology

For many years, electric marine vehicles struggled to grab a footing in the marine vehicle market. All that is changing. According to IDTechEx, the market for recreational electric marine vehicles is expected to climb from from its current value of $2.6 billion to $6.3 billion by 2023. Marine EV's have many benefits and advantages over their gas-powered cousins, and both manufacturers and cap...

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Global carbon emissions to hit 36 billion tonnes in 2013

The year 2013 will be record breaking for global carbon emissions, according to the Global Carbon Project, but it won’t be a good one. This year is set to break the record for high level of global carbon emissions with around 36 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels. This is a 2.1 percent rise from last year and a 61 percent rise above 1990 levels – the baseline...

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Nickel and lithium used for better, low-cost water-splitting device

A device developed at Stanford University uses silicon and nickel to produce clean hydrogen fuel. Stanford University scientists created their silicon-based water splitter to utilize sunlight to split water into its two components: hydrogen and oxygen. Water-splitting is one way to harness the energy of the sun even if the sun itself is not shinning. “Solar cells only work when the sun is...

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The future of batteries: Self-healing and virus-made electrodes

The future of technology – everything from electric cars to smart devices – hinges on the development of more powerful and more durable energy storage devices. One of the most promising of the new energy storage devices are batteries based on the use of lithium as an energy storage material. One of the most common types is the lithium-ion battery in which energy is released or stored when...

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Rainforest microbe dissolves lignin, shows promise in biofuel production

It’s often speculated that many a cure for society’s ills – cancer, AIDS, the need for new fuel sources - could be found in an yet unknown living organism that is living in the world’s rich but fast disappearing rainforests. Now, scientists from the U.S.-based Joint BioEnergy Institute at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have found a microbe living in the soil of the...

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Duke University device converts microwave signals to energy

Researchers at Duke University have developed a device that can convert microwave signals to energy. The device can be configured and tuned to capture microwave signals and convert them into a direct current voltage capable of recharging a cellphone battery or other small electronic devices. The researchers believe that they could also tune their energy harvester to capture and...

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World War II fungi studied for biofuel production process

A fungi known for destroying tents in the Pacific theater during World War II is being studied by scientists at the United States Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for use in better biofuel production. An enzyme blend to transform tough, woody plant material such as corn stalks and wood chips into fuel is considered a key component in the...

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The future of thin-film solar: Graphene coated with silicon remains conductive

Solar cells of the future could use graphene as a transparent contact layer. Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie have found that grapheme retains certain properties valuable to solar cells even when coated with silicon. They remain extremely conductive and completely transparent while being inexpensive and nontoxic. “We examined how graphene’s conductive properties change if it...

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Rust based materials used for better artificial photosynthesis method

Chemists at Boston College are looking at how rust could play a crucial role in developing an economical way to harness artificial photosynthesis to create clean energy. Natural photosynthesis – the means by which plants and other photosynthetic organisms convert sunlight into energy – consists of two processes: oxidation and reduction. Oxidation produces oxygen gas, while reduction produces organic molecules. In...

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